Chariot Learning Blog

Do you have any high school seniors or college freshmen in your life? If so, you probably need a money tree in your backyard and perhaps even a spa day. They, on the other hand, need sage advice about how to make the most of college experience. Luckily for them (sorry, not you), Mike Metzler can help. Mike’s excellent book Carpe College! Seize Your Whole College Experience is free in e-book form from now until Tuesday, 12/2 at midnight CST. Carpe College! is chock full of sage advice on how to plan for and actually achieve the least stressful, most successful transition from high school to college possible. Discover the power behind the Carpe College mantra: Know Thyself. Have a Plan. Assume No One Else Cares. Such wisdom truly has no price but is irresistible when the price is free.

If, like us, you love Rochester and love books, you’re probably looking forward to the next Greater Rochester Teen Book Festival. And if, unlike us, you’re artistically inclined, you can do a lot to make the 10th Annual Teen Book Festival in May 2015 even more amazing: design the TBF t-shirt and program cover. They’re looking for teen artwork, so get to work! The deadline is March 1, but why wait?

(This is a special Thanksgiving post to celebrate just how much all of us at Chariot Learning plan to eat today! If you really want to get in touch with the meaning of Thanksgiving, check out the Roots2Words Root of the Week: GRAT-.) Looking to add a lot more words your personal lexicon or just want to better understand the English language? Learning the common roots, prefixes, and suffixes that so many of our words are based on gives you the tools to recognize familiar words or decode unfamiliar words. That’s the Roots2Words way!   Your Roots2Words Affix of the Week is -VORE: -VORE is a suffix meaning one who eats. (Suffixes appear at the end of words)   **EXAMPLES** carnivore (noun) – one who eats meat or flesh; a predator BREAKDOWN: CARN- (flesh) + -VORE (one who eats) folivore (noun) – one who eats leaves BREAKDOWN: FOL- (leaf) +…

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Looking to add a lot more words your personal lexicon or just want to better understand the English language? Learn the common roots, prefixes, and suffixes that so many of our words are based on, and you’ll have the tools to recognize familiar words or decode unfamiliar ones. That’s the Roots2Words way!   Your Roots2Words Affix of the Week is TRA-: TRA- is a prefix meaning across or through. (Prefixes appear at the beginning of words)   **EXAMPLES** tradition (noun) – a practice or aspect of culture that is passed from person to person or generation to generation BREAKDOWN: TRA- (across) + DIT- (dare) + -ION (act of) traduce (verb) – to speak maliciously and falsely of; to defame or slander BREAKDOWN: TRA- (across) + DUC- (lead) trajectory (noun) – the path of an object through space; a course of development over time BREAKDOWN: TRA- (across) + JECT- (throw) +…

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Looking to add a lot more words your personal lexicon or just want to better understand the English language? Learn the common roots, prefixes, and suffixes that so many of our words are based on, and you’ll have the tools to recognize familiar words or decode unfamiliar ones. That’s the Roots2Words way!   Your Roots2Words Affix of the Week is RETRO-: RETRO- is a prefix meaning back or backwards. (Prefixes appear at the beginning of words)   **EXAMPLES** retroactive (adj) – applying or referring to the past BREAKDOWN: RETRO- (backwards) + ACT- (do) + -IVE (inclined to) retroflection (noun) – being bent backwards BREAKDOWN: RETRO- (backwards) + FLECT- (bend) + -ION (state of) retrograde (adj) – moving or bending backwards; tending towards an earlier or worse condition BREAKDOWN: RETRO- (backwards) + GRAD- (move or step) retrogress (verb) – to degenerate or go backward into an earlier condition BREAKDOWN: RETRO- (back)…

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We, both culturally and individually, tend to take tests like the SAT and ACT seriously because of the opportunities high scores can unlock. However, most students and families maintain perspective about the exams, while others can only be described as lackadaisical in their approach. All in all, on the national level, we tend to get worked up about the concept of the tests and not so much their ongoing administration. But imagine if we in the United States observed each test day by doing the following: Ban airport landings and departures for 40 minutes to assure quiet during a critical listening portion of the test. Open markets and businesses an hour late so that city traffic would clear up for students on way to the exam sites. Issue emergency numbers so students stuck in traffic can request police escort rides before gates to the test sites close. Delayed or cancel…

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