Category Archives: College

Like most educators, I’ve worked with a healthy number of twins, triplets, and other siblings very close in age. The variation in how these students approach the idea of working together always amuses me: some siblings would never think of studying apart, while others crave just an hour or two a week respite from their brother or sister. And that’s just for test prep. Imagine how much thought goes into the question of whether siblings that have progressed in lockstep–and often matching outfits–from nursery school through high school want to attend the same college and university. Then imagine those same important questions from the position of the college admissions office… Many experts assert or at least infer that being a twin or sibling doesn’t influence admissions decisions. Yet, the Common App and other applications inquire about siblings, sometimes even asking if a sibling is applying to the same school. Legacy…

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Fall is here–so are big exams and college applications. Whether you are looking to go away for school or stay local, the countdown to college begins with many things to think about, including issues related to good health. Luckily, Julie Dickens—who knows all about these issues as a parent of high school and college students, healthcare professional, and founder of Cold FAid™—shared four powerful tips with us to help you stay healthy while in school. 1. Get Organized The first thing that you should do to ready your health portfolio for college is to organize who to call if you need to see a health care provider. Enter into your mobile phone your contacts for the following: primary care provider, dentist, ophthalmologist, pharmacy, and health care insurance carrier. Make sure to obtain a copy of your health insurance card to carry in your wallet. 2. Think Prevention Be sure to…

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Should you carve out time from a hectic schedule to meet an alum if the school offers it? Why bother if this meeting isn’t required or doesn’t “count” in a college’s decision? As an experienced volunteer alumni interviewer and college administrator, I recommend three important instances to accept the offer to meet an alum: 1. This school is near the top of your list. After your conversation, the alum volunteer will send admissions a summary of your discussion, an assessment of your strengths, or simply answer the question “do you think this student would be a good fit at our institution?” So, even if the meeting doesn’t officially “count,” positive comments from the interviewer could help, and will never hurt. 2. Your interest in the school is strong enough that you’ll also make time to prepare for the meeting. Don’t memorize the admission material or the school fight song; do…

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The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship is one of the most valuable college scholarships in the United States. It pays up to full tuition, a monthly salary, and a yearly book allowance for those applicants who wish to become officers in the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marines. Strictly speaking, an ROTC participant is not joining the Armed Forces. Participants will not be sent to “boot camp.” However, the primary purpose of the ROTC program is to produce its officers, so they must agree to serve as officers in the military after graduation in order to go through the entire program, or if they have received an ROTC scholarship. Initially enrolling (the first two years of college) does not obligate participants to serve unless they have also received a scholarship. Scholarship winners generally serve four years on active duty. ROTC classes normally involve one elective class and…

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Remember how stressful car shopping used to be? Every auto, new and used alike, had a sticker price, but hardly anyone actually paid that price. Instead, every car sale involved intense negotiations, where the salesperson would endeavor to upsell while the customer haggled the cost downwards. In the end, someone lost the negotiation, either paying too much for a car or sacrificing too much commission. No wonder most car dealerships have adopted no-haggle pricing! No buyers like to spend more–sometimes tens of thousands more–than they have to. The rational model of economic decision making assumes that people make choices that maximize benefits and minimize any costs, but that model also assumes that a buyer or seller has full and perfect information on which to base a choice. Yet, every college applicant acts with very incomplete information, and nearly every college student forks over more in tuition than necessary. Why? While…

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As far back as the 15th century, the lovelorn and frivolous alike consulted the Daisy Oracle or effeuiller la marguerite in order to divine whether their affections were requited. Asking a flower whether she loves me or loves me not instead of questioning the lady in question herself may strike modern sensibilities as primitive or passive aggressive (note the petal pulling) but we’re not so different today. In the high stakes game of college admissions, some applicants and their families consult every oracle under the sun to pierce the veil of mystery and prognosticate the true desires of admissions professionals. Luckily, other more rational parties simply survey them 😉 The National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) conducts both an Admission Trends Survey and a Counseling Trends Survey every year to track various factors related to the transition from high school to postsecondary education in the U.S. along with information…

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