Tag Archives: coaching

Anyone with even a passing knowledge of basketball will recognize the name of Michael Jordan, widely considered one of the best–if not the very best–players of all time. Jordan combined ferocious physical and mental strength with incomparable skill and an indefatigable will to win. However, he attributes his legendary success to one train above all others: My best skill was that I was coachable. I was a sponge and aggressive to learn. What does “coachable” mean? Have you ever met someone who seems sure he or she knows it all, someone who has no interest or perhaps even ability to learn from others? How about someone who crumbles under even constructive criticism, externalizing failure or blame? Those are definitely NOT examples of coachability. Instead, consider the traits someone who is coachable shows consistently: Interested in becoming better, even if that requires hard work Willing to listen and learn Eager to…

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We like to think that anyone who works with Chariot Learning recognizes our commitment to the same levels of coaching, practice, and incremental improvement over time we teach our students. Simply put, every member of the team embraces the challenge of being a true test prep and/or tutoring professional rather than a hobbyist or dilettante. That level of industry understanding, educational expertise, and executive function makes a massive difference in student outcomes and does not happen by accident. How does the Chariot Learning stay ahead of important developments in education and testing while delivering quality prep and practice testing to over 1000 students across Upstate New York a year? How did we nail the Best of Rochester Award in the Tutoring Service category for two years in a row? The answer is simple: professional development. When your founder has over 25 years of experience in the test prep industry and…

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If you’re looking for dramatic improvement in any endeavor, you can’t escape the two drivers of profound, positive change: coaching and practice. Of the two, practice seems to be self-explanatory. Better takes practice. No one can argue that. But why does coaching matter just as much? Couldn’t a properly motivated individual with sufficient time and resources self-prep to wild success? Perhaps, but the common route to uncommon achievement always involves one or more exceptional coaches. Just ask your favorite performer or athlete–assuming you can get access! Even Bill Gates, one of the most successful (if you use wealth as a measure of success) self-made businessmen of all time believes in the necessity of coaching: “Everyone needs a coach. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a basketball player, a tennis player, a gymnast or a bridge player.” Coaching matters because true greatness does not occur by accident. We who seek to achieve…

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Sports coaches seem to know a lot more about planning for success than the rest of us. How else could you explain their nearly universal success at getting teens to prepare diligently every day for months in advance for a test that might not ever even take place? Most teachers would sacrifice a month of summer for that level of commitment from their students, right? (OK, maybe a week of summer at most…) Athletic coaches, aided of course by the allure of American sports culture, tend to be excellent at eliciting the behaviors required for incremental improvement over time. We can credit a collective acceptance of the aphorism, “You play like you practice,” but should also look beyond that to understand why teen athletes are willing to do whatever it takes to be ready on game day: everyone understands that you cannot become an elite athlete overnight. Well before a…

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One way going to college can set you up for a great career is if you plan to work for the public sector. As the map below illustrates, every state’s highest paid public employee works for an institute of higher learning: The author of this article hits the nail on the head: You may have heard that the highest-paid employee in each state is usually the football coach at the largest state school. This is actually a gross mischaracterization: Sometimes it is the basketball coach. If you’re not a football or basketball player, don’t worry… there’s always the private sector!

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