Tag Archives: PSAT

Take a official, full length practice PSAT under proctored conditions online, and find out your score as soon as you are done! Registrants will login over Zoom and take a full PSAT under the guidance of an expert proctor, who will then help everyone score their tests. We will send registrants a pdf of the test they will take. The fee for this proctored test is $40. You can take this test on its own or as part of our October PSAT Quick Review. What should you have ready when the test starts? A printed copy of the provided test pdf A printed answer grid Pencils Calculator Snacks and water Advance registration is required. Register by either speaking to your Chariot Learning teacher or completing our Student Information Form. **Be sure to let us know if you want to register for a follow-up review session.** NOTE: This test will be…

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This time of year finds us answering a lot of questions about the PSAT, from parents eager to arrange prep to others wondering if their teens should take the the October test at all. And, really, the question deserves consideration. Just about every high school has its juniors, and sometimes even sophomores, sit for the PSAT. Schools have good reason to administer these tests, thanks to the wealth of score data the College Board sends back. But is the test worth any single student’s time? Why take the PSAT? The College Board describes many benefits to taking the PSAT, but only a couple of them seem persuasive. Consider each one: Discover Your AP® Potential BAD IDEA, at least if you are already a junior. By that time, qualified students with access are already enrolled in several AP classes. 10th graders who haven’t already tried AP European or World History might…

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The PSAT/NMSQT serves a number of valuable functions; not only does this test act as the first criterion for National Merit Scholarship recognition, but its scores also offer insight into future SAT results. No, the PSAT is not exactly like the official SAT or even a well-proctored practice SAT, but PSAT scores should give high school juniors a fairly accurate sense of how–in the absence of any other prep, of course–they will score on the SAT. What should we infer, then, from October’s alarmingly low PSAT scores? Anecdotal information has finally been confirmed by College Board, though not in any forum available to the general public. Fortunately, Art Sawyer and his colleagues at Compass Education Group pieced together the fragmented reports available to suss out some alarming conclusions: The number of juniors scoring 1400+ dropped 30%, from 71,000 to less than 50,000. The number of sophomores scoring 1400+ dropped 36%.…

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Everybody knows the old saying, “You reap what you sow.” Just as high school juniors (and some sophomores) take the PSAT in October, so do they receive their scores in December or maybe early January. In some ways, taking the test is the easy part. While there are some good reasons to take the PSAT, the college application is not one of them, since schools won’t use these scores for admissions purposes. This explains why some students–and their parents–might find understanding PSAT scores trickier than answering test questions. To understand the PSAT score report, you must understand both the arbitrary scale and a deceptive similarity to the SAT. PSAT SCALE Anyone who has come up through the American education system understands tests scores on the 1-100 scale or in letter form from A to F. We also grasp the complexities of 4-point GPAs in comparison to 5-point scales. But what…

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The beginning of December can be a very busy time for anyone connected with test prep or college planning.  Why? That’s when students start to get their PSAT scores back and, consequently, when parents get to see their child’s PSAT scores.  For many families, this marks the official beginning of a year or more of test-related angst and pressure. It doesn’t have to be that way. If you’re a parent who hasn’t yet learned what these scores mean and what your next steps should be, consider these tips to get you through the initial discovery of your child’s PSAT score: Other than for National Merit and related scholarship consideration, your child’s PSAT score means nothing!  In fact, a 10th grader’s PSAT score is not even used for National Merit Scholarship competition.  While the PSAT does offer a useful baseline to predict future SAT performance, it is, for all intents and purposes,…

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Take a official, full length practice PSAT under proctored conditions at our Brighton office, and find out your score as soon as you are done! The fee for this proctored test is $40. Only 18 seats are available, and priority goes to students enrolled in our October PSAT Quick Review. Participants MUST register in advance by emailing info@chariotlearning.com. Students should bring pencils, snacks, watches, and calculators. We always administer the full-length SAT from the most recent College Board student bulletin.   Frequently Asked Questions Why are high-quality practice tests so important? What makes a practice test high quality? Are practice tests all that is needed for a higher score?

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