Tag Archives: scholarships

Choosing a school is already a difficult decision, making the choice with the ROTC scholarship in mind could make the decision easier… or that much harder. Here are some things to keep in mind that have the potential to make the decision-making process less of a headache. One important first step is to help your son or daughter to decide on a major, if they have not done so already. This can narrow down the search for the right school. Military vs. non-military college is another topic to think about. A traditional college is going to offer your son or daughter a traditional college experience for the most part. He or she will still be required to fulfill their ROTC obligations. A military service academy is not going to reflect the traditional college experience, but it will help you son or daughter learn the military culture and help them to…

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A writer in the Wall Street Journal posited an interesting if not provocative question recently, asking “Is It Fair to Award Scholarships Based on the SAT?” Predictably, the arguments against test scores focus more on questions about student diversity and unequal distributions of wealth and resources. They do not, however, seriously address the idea of merit, which is to say a certain standard of academic accomplishment according to which merit aid is awarded. Perhaps a reticence to acknowledge the elephant in the room in this–and countless other think pieces decrying standardized testing–makes sense. After all, for all the problems with the SAT and ACT, the alternative is much worse: grades are even less reliable and more dependent on privilege than test scores. Is the idea that high school grades cannot be entirely trusted a surprise? Presumably, a student’s grades represent a quantitative expression of academic output over the majority of…

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The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship is one of the most valuable college scholarships in the United States. It pays up to full tuition, a monthly salary, and a yearly book allowance for those applicants who wish to become officers in the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marines. Strictly speaking, an ROTC participant is not joining the Armed Forces. Participants will not be sent to “boot camp.” However, the primary purpose of the ROTC program is to produce its officers, so they must agree to serve as officers in the military after graduation in order to go through the entire program, or if they have received an ROTC scholarship. Initially enrolling (the first two years of college) does not obligate participants to serve unless they have also received a scholarship. Scholarship winners generally serve four years on active duty. ROTC classes normally involve one elective class and…

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It’s no surprise that paying for college is a top tier financial stressor.  A June 2017 Gallup poll finds that, after healthcare costs and making ends meet, “college costs” ties with “low income” as the 3rd and 4th highest financial stressors for families. Sky-high college costs are motivating talented students to seek academic scholarships. The trick is knowing where to look. Years ago, we shared a helpful New York Times list detailing which colleges award the most merit-based aid.  Digging deeper into the listed schools rewards a savvy student with a better idea of how her scores can pay actual dollars in the college marketplace. A look at college websites reveals that colleges vary widely in the way they publicize and award the cash. Most college websites list merit scholarship opportunities under “financial aid” (am I the only one to find this a bit misleading?), describing various “excellence” and “leadership”…

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The metaphor of “many moving parts” to describe a highly complex operation can be applied to many tasks in life, including college admissions. The entire process–from choosing schools to earning top SAT & ACT scores to completing the application–can take months or even years, yet still result in frustration and failure. How can we encourage teens to lean into the college admissions process in a proactive and effective fashion? College Board has an idea: MONEY. That’s right, the organization behind the SAT has created College Board Opportunity Scholarships to celebrate and reward the effort students put into getting ready for college: WHAT DO I HAVE TO DO? College Board will reward six steps in the college admissions process. By completing each step, students become eligible for the scholarship associated with that step. Students who complete all six steps are also eligible for the seventh Complete Your Journey scholarship. 1. Build…

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I frequently hear a common refrain from the parents of students I consult with in my College Admissions Consultation practice: “my child does not have the best grades. I’m assuming his or her educational options will be limited to junior college.” While the excellent SUNY junior colleges in our area can give a student a year or two to mature further and be ready to complete a four-year degree, it is a myth to think that B and C students will not have excellent four-year college choices and scholarships (free money!) This is the case whether the student is simply unmotivated, or whether they have learning differences (which may for may not require an IEP or 504 Plan.) It’s all about finding carefully assessed “best fit” colleges where a student is likely to be admitted, successful, and happy. Several years ago I had the privilege of working with a young…

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